FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

 

What Does the Puree Taste Like?

The puree is often described as tart and fruity some people find it bitter.  Some describe it as “fermented”.  Some say “delicious”. Certainly the taste is very strong.  Regardless of how an individual perceives the taste, the nutritional composition is unmatched.

Taste is a very personal thing.  An individual’s perception of flavours can be influenced by time of day, what you have already eaten and cultural background.

“Sour apricot”, “sour mango”, “high bush cranberry” are terms often used when we sample the puree – we say “tastes like seabuckthorn!

Is The Tea As Sour As The Puree?

The tea tastes very much like a mix of green tea or black tea it is not sour!

The leaf of seabuckthorn is pesticide free.

What Does The Oil Taste Like?

The oil is somewhat sweet and fruity (at least in our opinion).

Our oil is new to the market and we will be able to offer customers opinions as we do more tasting.

I am interested in the soberly (sic Solberry) purée in order to increase my Vit. C intake from whole food sources instead of from synthetic isolated molecules. However heat destroys vitamin C and so am wondering how you process the seabuckthorn berries for your products to preserve the Vitamin C content?

We do pasteurize our puree.  The Vitamin C on the Nutrition Facts Table is  measured after the pasteurization process.

The power of seabuckthorn is its unique composition of nutrients.  Seabuckthorn is a very rich food source with over 190 bio available components.  In general there are many nutrients other than vitamins C, E and A that can provide great benefit for peoples’ systems.

We feel that 25% of your daily vitamin C in a tablespoon of seabuckthorn is a pretty significant amount (plus 15% Vitamin E and 6% Vitamin A).  We have added nothing to our products to augment vitamin content so what you get is the berry in the bottle I hope this answers some of your questions.

Palmitic acid and (Solberry) seabuckthorn

  • Yes – seabuckthorn contains palmitic acid. Palmitic acid is one the most common fatty acids in our diet.
  • The studies that refer to the ill effects of palmitic acid were done with “isolated” palmitic acid with isolated cells in Petri dishes.  These studies were cited when a company started promoting synthesized Omega 7 about 5 years ago and used palmitic acid as a marketing tool to advance their product.
  • Any perceived ill effects of palmitic acid are countermanded by the oleic acid (Omega 9) in seabuckthorn pulp. Palmitic acid was vilified 60 years ago (eggs) and this idea has remained as an “old wives’ tale” since then.  There are numerous modern era studies from around the world, including Canadian research, that confirm the positive benefits of palmitic acid in the diet.  The  discussion that the presence of palmitic acid completely cancels any nutritional benefit of seabuckthorn which is simply not the case.
  • Even if palmitic acid was bad for you (it’s not) the remaining nutritional composition of Solberry Seabuckthorn Puree makes our puree one of the most nutritious shelf ready products in the world.

Do you heat (Solberry) seabuckthorn?

This is a question that we have been getting a lot this year.  We do pasteurize our puree.  The Vitamin C on the Nutrition Facts Table is  measured after the process.

The power of seabuckthorn is its unique composition of nutrients.  Seabuckthorn is a very rich food source with over 190 bio available components.  In general, there are many nutrients other than vitamins C, E and A that can provide great benefit for peoples’ systems.

We feel that 25% of your daily vitamin C in a tablespoon of Solberry seabuckthorn is a pretty significant amount.  We have added nothing to our products to augment vitamin content – so what you get is the berry in the bottle I hope this answers some of your questions.